Category Archives: Wildlife

2016 Forestry & Wildlife Program Summary

It could not have  been a better day for our 3rd annual Forestry & Wildlife Program. If you were there for the first time, you would not know this program is only three years old. I am so indebted to everyone who works to bring this together – hay bales, trailers, tractors, barn, presenters, location and of course the food. Forester Alan Tucker sponsored this year’s meeting. Todd Milam with the Georgia Forestry Commission, Alan Tucker, and Martin Smith stayed up all night cooking our pig.

A big thanks to Pebble Hill Plantation for hosting the program this year. Our speakers were Mr. Luke Harvard (USDA – Wildlife), Dr. David Moorhead (UGA Extension Specialist), and Mr. Richard Coleman (NRCS). We had 55 people attend the meeting which represented 99,860 acres of forest land. Here are some pictures from Tuesday’s program:

Loading trailers

Loading trailers

UGA Extension Specialist Dr. David Moorhead discusses storm-damaged trees on a site at Pebble Hill Plantation.

UGA Extension Specialist Dr. David Moorhead discusses storm-damaged trees on a site at Pebble Hill Plantation.

Mr. Luke Harvard with USDA Wildlife Division discusses beaver management.

Mr. Luke Harvard with USDA Wildlife Division discusses beaver management.

The dam in the background has been damaged by beavers. Luke Harvard is working with Pebble Hill to help with the issue.

The dam in the background has been damaged by beavers. Luke Harvard is working with Pebble Hill to help with the issue.

Our pig for lunch inside the Sugar Hill Barn at Pebble Hill Plantation

Our pig for lunch inside the Sugar Hill Barn at Pebble Hill Plantation

Eating lunch following the program

Eating lunch following the program

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Pre-Plant Burndown Options & Plant Back Restrictions For Peanuts

We’ve all been getting some questions about pre-plant burndown options for peanuts. Dooly County Ag Agent Ronnie Barentine and UGA Extension Peanut Weed Scientist Dr. Eric Prostko put together a few thoughts for us consider:

1)    Primary burndown herbicides will either be glyphosate or paraquat.  As we get closer to planting, paraquat might be preferred if a quicker burndown is needed.

2) Potential tank-mix partners with either of the above herbicides include the following:

  • 2,4-D (16 oz/A) – will help improve the control of wild radish and primrose.  Plant-back restriction for peanut based upon UGA research is 7 days.
  • FirstShot (0.5-0.8 oz/A) – will also help improve the control of radish and primrose. This may also be useful in fields where off-target movement of 2,4-D is a concern. Peanut plant-back restriction for FirstShot is 30 days.
  • Aim or ET (1-2 oz/A) – either one of these herbicides can be useful in preplant burndown situations where annual morningglory plants (except smallflower) have already emerged. Aim can be applied anytime preplant up until 24 hours after planting. ET can be applied anytime pre-plant but before peanut emergence.

3) Growers who want to get early residual control of pigweed – especially when there is a potential long delay between application and planting – may want to include Dual Magnum (16 oz/A), Warrant (48 oz/A) or Valor (2 oz/A) in the burndown.  If Valor is used in the pre-plant burndown at least 30 DBP, an additional 2 oz/A can be used PRE after planting. Valor will also help improve the POST control of radish and primrose (+10-15%).  I must admit that I would prefer either Dual or Warrant for residual control in this situation to help protect Valor from potential resistance issues.  There are no peanut plant-back restrictions for Dual or Warrant.

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Pine Bark Coming Off?

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Last week, we looked at some loblolly and slash pines concerning the outer bark pealing. This stand is almost 20 years old and random trees appear to have this damage. The damage is only to the outside bark on not to the cambium layer (white later). We were confused about the damage since the bark was hard to pull off. UGA Extension Forester Dr. David Moorhead says he has seen this from time to time and it is from animal activity. This damage does look similar to a fungus in hardwoods called Smooth Patch which works on the outside bark. Concerning this stand, either birds but also fox squirrels have caused this damage. There may be other animals involved too. Most of the time they are looking under the bark for insects.

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Are beetles a concern?

We were concerned about beetles being attracted to the damaged trees. The resin that is leaking from the wounds can attract beetles. Ips beetles are a concern since they carry the blue stain fungus. However, Dr. Moorhead says that although Ips beetles are notorious for attacking injured trees, they can also disturb healthy trees. Sometimes the resin crystalizes quickly and it’s not a problem. Ips beetles can enter high on the tree, so preventative sprays are difficult. The good news is that Ips beetles hit a few trees and leave the sight. They do not damage a stand like Southern Pine Beetle. We usually do more damage to a stand cutting down trees from Ips beetles than leaving them alone. Also, by the time we notice an Ips attack, the beetles are already gone.

Black turpentine beetles do not carry the blue stain fungus. Unlike Ips beetles, they enter the tree from the bottom. Spraying preventative for these beetles is effective. A pyrethroid insecticide, like Onyx, can be sprayed, but must be used every few weeks, because it has less residual.

 

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