Monthly Archives: December 2016

Controlling Bamboo

bamboo-052Golden bamboo (phyllostachys aurea) and other nonnative bamboos are perennial grass-like plants. These are runner types of bamboo, that spread with thick, underground stems called rhizomes. Clumping bamboo species grow in large clumps and are much slower in spreading. These rhizomes can spread more than 100 feet from the mother plant.

We did not get a chance to stop by a site of bamboo at Pebble Hill for our Forestry & Wildlife meeting this year. But Dr. Moorhead did cover this topic during lunch. Here is a picture of the site we would have visited, and actually is probably 90% controlled.

bamboo-054

When controlling these runner-types of bamboo, there needs to be some efforts to break up those rhizomes. In open area patches, you can use a tractor and disk to knock down and chop up the rhizome mat. Following this, we’ll still need to use herbicides. Dr. Moorhead recommends a soil active herbicide. Velpar L or Velpar DF is a good choice. This is made in the spring of the year. Use a site prep rate which will kill any trees with roots growing in the treated area. If pine are growing in the patch, use a release rate of Velpar noted on the herbicide label based on soil texture. If you cannot risk this kind of damage to the overstory trees, cut down the bamboo (crush it, burn, etc.), then treat the new shoots with 4% glyphosate (1 pint per 3 gallon mix)..

Here is an example of the rates of velpar from the UGA Pest Control Handbook. We need to be under “Coarse” texture on the far right: 2, 3 or 4 qt per acre for a release rate.

velpar-forestry

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Filed under Forestry

FSA – Livestock / Forage Disaster Program

This notice from Thomas County FSA in an effort to help cattleman producers. Please contact Thomas County FSA for more information:

Producers in Thomas County are eligible to apply for 2016 Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP) benefits on native pasture or improved pasture.

LFP provides compensation to eligible livestock producers who suffer grazing losses for covered livestock due to drought on privately owned or cash leased land or fire on federally managed land.

County committees can only accept LFP applications after notification is received by the National Office of qualifying drought or if a federal agency prohibits producers from grazing normal permitted livestock on federally managed lands due to qualifying fire.  Eligible livestock producers must complete a CCC-853 and the required supporting documentation no later than January 30, 2017 for 2016 losses.

Additional Information about LFP, including eligible livestock and fire criteria, is available at your local FSA office or online at: www.fsa.usda.gov.

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Filed under Forages, Livestock

UGA Cotton Market Update

cmn-12-9-16

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December 12, 2016 · 5:30 PM

2017 Georgia Ag Forecast

2017gaagforecast

Each year, economists from UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences in partnership with Georgia Farm Bureau and the Georgia Department of Agriculture present an outlook of agricultural markets for the coming year.

The upcoming farm bill and the Food and Drug Administration’s veterinary feed directive (VFD) will be the featured topics this year. Bob Redding of Washington’s The Redding Firm, will share information and moderate a conversation about the upcoming 2018 farm bill in Macon, Tifton, Bainbridge, Lyons and Waynesboro. This year’s 2017 Georgia Ag Forecast meetings in South GA will be held at these locations:

Monday, January 23: Tifton – UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center

Tuesday, January 24: Bainbridge – Decatur County Agricultural Center

Wednesday, Jan. 25: Lyons – Toombs County Agri-Center

Thursday, Jan. 26: Waynesboro – Burke County Office Park

Click on this link to see all other dates in Georgia and registration: http://www.caes.uga.edu/about/signature-events/ag-forecast.html

Schedules

Each session will have the following schedule (Except Tifton):

  • 9 a.m. – On-site check-in and coffee
  • 10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. – Seminar presentations
  • 11:30 a.m. – Networking lunch

Tifton schedule:

  • 7 a.m. – On-site check-in and coffee
  • 7:30 a.m. – Breakfast buffet lines open
  • 8 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. – Seminar presentations

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Implications Of Bacterial Boll Rot

At our Georgia Association of County Ag Agents (GACAA) meeting, we get to see presentations and posters of work done around the state. I wanted to share this poster done by Holly Anderson in Ben Hill County, EVEN THOUGH our conditions this year were as less conducive for boll rot as they have been in a long time.

We’re normally wet in our area and this is a concern of many growers. Dr. Kemerait always has points about boll rot, but it is unavoidable if cotton is subjected to prolonged periods of wetness and humidity late in the growing season. This project shows the progression of boll rot from infection to harvest and potential losses.

implicationsofbacterialbollrot-holly

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December Row Crop Disease Update

A few things to think about with regards to disease and nematode management in preparation for the 2017 field season.

La Nina:  Our UGA Extension climatologist Pam Knox has good information available on our current conditions, but here are my thoughts:

We are currently in a “weak” La Nina situation, “weak” because the equatorial waters of the cost of Ecuador are more than a half degree COOLER than normal.  As best I can tell, the waters have been about 7/10 of a degree cooler which barely qualifies as a La Nina (as opposed to last year where we had a robust and sure-enough El Nino).  So what does this mean? During La Nina years, the Southeast tends to (“tends to” means more often than not, but not always..) experience warmer and drier winters. Because we have a weak La Nina, this forecast could change.

Pigweed seedhead in broccoli before Thanksgiving. We are yet to have frost to knock back pigweed growth.

Pigweed seedhead in broccoli before Thanksgiving. We are yet to have frost to knock back pigweed growth.

How does our current “La Nina” impact our recommendations?

  1.  Drier is not a good thing as it may mean we don’t fill up irrigation ponds for next year.  It my mean we have a lot of trouble establishing cover crops this fall.
  2.  Warmer temperatures may mean that kudzu, volunteer peanuts, corn, cotton-regrowth, etc. pathogens (like those that cause soybean rust and southern corn rust) may survive and increase longer than they would with an earlier “killing” frost.  Also, as long as the crops and volunteers are active in the field, nematode populations can continue to increase and build.  This will lead to larger populations for next season. Once the plants are killed, the nematodes can no longer feed. Once soil temps drop below 65F, the activity of the todes drops off as well.
  3.  We may get some very cold weather soon, so we may not need to worry that much; however the general prediction is that we will have a warmer winter.
  4.  The weather this winter will have some effect on TSWV and insects for next year.  It remains to be seen what and how… but it will impact them.

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Filed under Corn, Cotton, Disease, Peanuts, Soybeans, Weather

Cotton Variety Trial Harvest

cottonvarietytrial-harvest-015

The only good thing about having no rain is having good harvest conditions. We picked our dryland variety trial on Monday, the day before the first rain came in. All in all, I’ve heard good cotton yields this year from multiple varieties. Not a lot of difference in dryland and irrigated since rain through the season was good.

Things went really well for us on Monday, and we had plenty of help. We harvested the first two reps only, but with longer rows, it’ll show difference in varieties once the numbers are completed. We also took samples to send to the UGA micro-gin. We’re going to look at grades and turnout also. I’ll compile the information and present it at our cotton meeting on January 24th. Here are some pictures from this week:

Jodie Stringer and Lanie Stains get the scale set up.

Jodie Stringer and Lanie Stains get the scale set up.

Weighing

Weighing the next variety

Mat Thompson, Andrew Sawyer, & Lanie Stains

Mat Thompson, Andrew Sawyer, & Lanie Stains

Taking samples for grade analysis.

Taking samples for grade

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