Category Archives: Uncategorized

Citrus Update

Call 12293335185 to register for Thursday’s meeting.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

FINAL UPW TRAINING TOMORROW

Using Pesticides Wisely Trainings


All applicators who are planning to apply Engenia, Tavium, and Xtendimax must attend UPW Trainings this year prior to April 15, 2022. However, those that attended a UGA Extension Weed Management Update in 2022, signed in, and received credit do not have to attend UPW Training. Weed Management Updates were held in the following counties between January 10th and February 17th: Pierce, Wayne, Emanuel, Jefferson, Burke, Cotton Commission Annual Meeting – Weed Training section, Lee, Macon/Taylor/Peach/Houston, Calhoun, Mitchell/Baker, Grady, Tift, Colquitt, Irwin/Ben Hill, Worth, Berrien, Screven, Bulloch, Terrell, Webster, Sumter, Dooly, Pulaski/Wilcox, Appling, and Tattnall/Evans/Chandler. All applicators of Engenia, Tavium, & XtendiMax herbicides must also have a private pesticide license. There will not be an extension or issuance of the special applicators license training that has been offered in the past, so all applicators must obtain their private pesticide license.

UPW trainings will be held at the Thomas County Extension Office at 9:30AM on the following dates:

Wednesday, March 16

Wednesday, March 23

Wednesday, March 30

Wednesday, April 6

Wednesday, April 13

Multiple dates have been available for our grower’s convenience and due to the size limitations of our meeting space. To register or if you have any questions please call UGA Extension Thomas County.

For information on how to apply for a Private Pesticide Applicators License please visit: https://extension.uga.edu/content/dam/extension/programs-and-services/pesticide-safety-education/documents/Step-by-Step_PAT_Course_Ordering_Instructions_Aug%2020.pdf

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Pesticide Clean Day – May 3, 2022 – Houston County

Pre-register prior to April 28, 2022! This program is free for private and commercial pesticide applicators. Contact your local UGA Extension Office for more information or go to http://agr.georgia.gov/georgia-clean-day.aspx.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Freezing Temperatures On The Way: What does this mean for pecans?

Mar 11, 2022 | Written by Lenny Wells

After a couple of weeks of 80 degree temperatures we are facing low temperatures in the mid 20s this weekend. Forecasts call for temps anywhere from 25 degrees to 28 degrees from middle Georgia down to Valdosta. Temps further north in the Athens area may get down to 23 degrees. What does this mean for pecan trees?

The good news is that we have not seen much bud break yet. We only see a very small percentage of buds even swelling at this point. I have had a few photos sent my way of some buds just beginning to break. The first sign that pecan buds are beginning to expand is a bud stage that is termed outer scale split. This stage is characterized by the outer covering (or scale) that surrounds a dormant bud splitting open when the bud inside starts to expand. Eventually the outer scale is pushed off the end of the bud to reveal a tight green bud underneath. Dormant pecan buds can easily handle 24 degrees but green pecan tissues freeze at around 26 degrees. On most trees, pecan bud development has not yet advanced to a stage that I would be overly concerned about.

If you have buds that have started to elongate, especially if they have pushed the outer scale off completely, even if the green buds are still somewhat compressed tightly, they could still be at risk of damage if temps get down to 26 degrees. But we haven’t seen many trees at this stage yet.

The only trees I have seen with foliage expansion to date are trees in nurseries. Usually these are the first to break bud. Seedlings usually start first and then some early grafted varieties begin.

Whether its in the orchard or nursery, any foliage that has expanded will likely take a hit if we see temps in the 26-28 degree range for a few hours. Fortunately as I said, we havent seen much expanded foliage yet and much of what we have seen has been on nursery trees or newly planted trees. Even if you have foliage expanding in this situation and it gets killed by the freeze, that foliage will regrow as long as the wood is not damaged.

Damage to the pecan wood is of some concern for nursery trees and moreso for newly planted orchard trees and those in the 1-3 yr old range. The most common injury on such trees occurs when the sun warms tree bark during the day and then the bark rapidly cools after sunset. These abrupt fluctuations are most common on south or southwest sides of trunks and branches, and they may kill the inner bark in those areas. Young and/or thin-barked trees are most susceptible to this type of injury especially as the sap begins to flow. Injury may not be visible initially and often shows up a few days to weeks later and will be detected by a browning of the cambium layer as you cut into the bark of the tree. Healthy cambium tissue will appear green. Sometimes the injured area of the trunk takes on a sunken or water soaked appearance. Trunk protectors will help minimize this type of injury on young orchard trees.

Rapid expansion and contraction of water within the wood and bark, particularly under falling night temperatures, can also sometimes result in cracks that may appear on trunks of young trees and also on the branches of older trees. These may be a few inches long and are often found on the southwest side of the tree. These cracks may heal over a little in the summer and can re-open again in winter.

When we have freeze injury to young trees, it sometimes is not detected for a considerable length of time, sometimes 2-3 years, as there is often enough healthy cambium to keep the trees going to a point and then they outgrow the cambium they have left, which can no longer support them, causing the trees to collapse. When this occurs the foliage usually turns brown and the tree may die suddenly. This usually shows up in May or June as the heat and water demand ramp up.

Overall, I expect damage to be minimal , if any to mature pecan trees. We will likely see some injury to young (newly planted-3 yr) trees in some areas if temperatures drop as low as we see forecast and they remain there for several hours.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Middle South Georgia Conservation District Press Release


Middle South Georgia Conservation District now offering feral swine control services

June 3, 2021: The Middle South Georgia Conservation District is excited to announce their participation in the Georgia Association of Conservation Districts’ (GACD) Feral Swine District Initiative. Landowners located within Ben Hill, Brooks, Colquitt, Crisp, Irwin, Thomas, Tift, Turner, and Worth Counties are invited to participate in the District’s feral swine control services.


Feral swine have become increasingly detrimental in Georgia, causing significant damage to agricultural crops and natural resources throughout the state. The economic impact of damage caused by feral swine in Georgia is estimated at over $150 million. Feral swine are one of the greatest invasive species challenges facing Georgia. Following an Initiative spearheaded by the Brier Creek Conservation District, Conservation Districts throughout Georgia are partnering with GACD to acquire feral swine control equipment and are contracting with local Hog Control Custodians to eradicate feral swine within the District.


The Middle South Georgia Conservation District serves as the local voice for soil and water conservation with producers and landowners in Ben Hill, Brooks, Colquitt, Crisp, Irwin, Thomas, Tift, Turner, and Worth Counties are invited to participate in the District’s feral swine control services.


If you are interested in hog control services, please contact the District’s Hog Control Custodian, Mark Land at (229) 343-5039 or gdl2025@att.net. For more information about GACD’s Feral Swine District Initiative, visit w.gacd.us/feralswine, email info@gacd.us or call 1-833-411-GACD.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

2020 Virtual Forestry Update

Leave a comment

October 8, 2020 · 5:27 PM

Whitetails 101

Leave a comment

September 23, 2020 · 3:36 PM

Financial Assistance for Ag Producers Zoom

August 25th Ag Update-flyer

Leave a comment

August 12, 2020 · 3:59 PM

Virtual Midville Field Day

2020 Midville Field Day

Leave a comment

August 3, 2020 · 1:38 PM

Protecting Stored Corn

Corn-Denting (3)Below is an excerpt from the 2020 UGA Corn Production Guide (page 79):  The key to storing grains and other commodities on the farm is to make storage conditions unfavorable for the survival of stored grain insects and molds.  Growers who will be storing for more than 6 months should strongly consider application of a grain protectant. Apply an approved grain protectant directly to the moving grain stream at the bottom of the bucket elevator or auger so the material has an opportunity to contact as many kernels as possible as the grain is moved. 

Insecticides labelled for empty bin treatments

  • Beta-cyfluthrin Tempo SC Ultra 0.25-0.5 fl oz/gal/1000 sq ft 3A Apply to all interior surfaces of storage bin and allow to dry before filling bins.
  • Deltamethrin Centynal EC 0.25-1.5 fl oz/gal/1000 sq ft 3A Apply to wall and floor surfaces of grain bins and warehouses prior to storing or handling grain.
  • Deltamethrin D-Fense SC 0.25-1.5 fl oz/gal/1000 sq ft 3A Use for exterior perimeter treatment only.
  • Deltamethrin Suspend SC 0.25-1.5 floz/gal/1000 sq ft 3A Apply finished spray to equipment, wall and floor surfaces of grain bins and warehouses prior to storing or handling grain.
  • Diatomaceous earth Insecto Dust: 1 lb/1000 sq ft Apply at least 2-3 days before filling bin. Use aeration fan or other air supply to apply dust.
  • Diatomaceous earth Dryacide 100 Dust: 1-3 lb/1000 sq ft Slurry: 1.5 lb/1.5 gal/100 sq ft Apply as a dust with a hand or power duster or as a slurry spray.
  • Diatomaceous earth Protect-It Dust: 0.6 lb/1000 sq ft Slurry: 1.5 lb/1.5 gal/100 sq ft Apply 2 weeks before filling bins. Use a dust blower or bin fan to reach all surfaces, cracks and crevices. Apply slurry as a fine mist.
  • Deltamethrin + chlorpyrifos methyl Storcide II 1.8 fl oz/gal/1000 sq ft 1B+3A Application can only be made from outside the bin using automated spray equipment.
  • Pyriproxyfen Nyguard IGR Concentrate 0.8-2.4 tsp/gal/1500 sq ft 4-12 ml/gal/1500 sq ft 7C This product will not kill adults but will control immatures. May be mixed with an adulticide.
  • S-methoprene Diacon-D IGR 1.5 oz/1000 sq ft 7A This product will not kill adults, but will control immatures; applicators must wear a dust mask and protective gloves.
  • S-methoprene Diacon IGR Fogging Treatment: 1 ml/1000 sq ft (0.2 tsp/1000 sq ft) Pressure Spray: 2 ml/1000 sq ft (0.4 tsp/1000 sq ft) 7A Apply fogging treatment in water or oil in a cold aerosol generator. Diacon IGR is an insect- growth regulator that interferes with the development of insects. It will not kill adult insects. Apply as a pressure spray in low-pressure sprayer to all areas that may harbor insect pests.

 Insecticides labelled for direct application to grain as a grain protectant

  • Pirimiphos-methyl Actellic 5E 8.6-11.5 fl oz (corn) 8.6-11.5 fl oz (grain sorghum) 1B Labeled for use on shelled corn, popcorn and grain sorghum only. DO NOT use if grain has been previously treated with Actellic or if Actellic will be used as a topdress treatment.
  • Deltamethrin Centynal EC 8.5 fl oz (corn) 9.1 fl oz (wheat) 4.9 fl oz (oats) 8.5 fl oz (grain sorghum) 8.5 fl oz (rye) 3A Labeled for use on barley, corn, oats, popcorn, rice rye, grain sorghum, and wheat.
  • Deltamethrin D-Fense SC 8.5 fl oz (corn) 9.1 fl oz (wheat) 8.5 fl oz (oats) 8.5 fl oz (grain sorghum) 8.5 fl oz (rye) 3A Labeled for use on barley, corn, oats, popcorn, rice, rye, grain sorghum, and wheat.
  • S-methoprene Diacon IGR 1.8-7 fl oz (corn) 1.8-7 fl oz (wheat) 1-4 fl oz (peanuts) 1-4 fl oz (oats) 1.8-7 fl oz (grain sorghum) 7A Labeled for use on wheat, corn, grain sorghum, barley, rice, oats, peanuts, and sunflower. Will not control weevils. Diacon IGR is an insectgrowth regulator that interferes with the development of insects; it will not kill adult insects. Treat existing insect populations with an adulticide before or at the same time as applying Diacon IGR. Apply only once to grain of known treatment history. Use highest rates for maximum residual. Lowest rate provides shorter residual.
  • S-methoprene Diacon-D IGR 8-10 lb 7A Labeled for use on cereal grains, corn, sunflower, canola, legumes, popcorn, wheat, spices, grain sorghum, rice, cocoa, peanuts, oats and millet. Will not control weevils. Diacon-D IGR is an insect-growth regulator that interferes with the development of insects. It will not kill adult insects. Treat existing insect populations with adulticide before or at the same time as applying Diacon-D IGR. Apply only once to grain of known treatment history
  • Deltamethrin + s-methoprene Diacon IGR PLUS 9-18 fl oz (corn) 9.6-19.2 fl oz (wheat) 5.2-10.3 fl oz (oats) 8-16 fl oz (grain sorghum) 9-18 fl oz (rye) 3A+7A Labeled for use on barley, corn, oats, popcorn, rice, rye, sorghum and wheat.
  • Diatomaceous earth Dryacide 100 1-2 lb/ton Thoroughly mix with grain. For use on grains, soybeans, peanuts, popcorn, and others (see label). Diatomaceous earth products are less effective when used on grain with increased moisture content and under humid conditions; diatomaceous earth is known to decrease test weight and grain flowability.
  • Diatomaceous earth Insecto 1 lb/ton 1-2 lb/ton (if infested) Apply uniformly as a dust on grains, soybeans, peanuts, popcorn, and others (see label). See note above.
  • Diatomaceous earth Protect-It 18 lb (wheat, beans, peas) 9.6 lb (oats) 16.8 lb (rye) Uniformly treat grain as it is loaded into bin. For use on grains, soybeans, peanuts, popcorn, and others (see label). See note above.
  • Spinosad Sensat 9.8 fl oz (corn) 10.5 fl oz (wheat) 5.9 fl oz (oats) 9.8 fl oz (grain sorghum) 5 Labeled for use on barley, bird seed, corn, foxtail millet, pearl millet, proso millet, oats, sorghum, triticale and wheat.
  • Deltamethrin + chlorpyrifosmethyl Storcide II 12.4 fl oz (wheat) 11.6 fl oz (grain sorghum) 6.6 fl oz (oats) 1B+3A Dilute with water or an FDA-approved food grade mineral oil or soybean oil. For use on wheat, barley, oats, rice, and grain sorghum.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized