Field Corn Weed & Disease Update

Some of our earlier planted corn is moving through the v8 growth stage. In this field corn, we are nearly past the time for over-the-top herbicide applications without yield loss. We’ve been applying mostly one shot Atrazine+RU+Prowl H2O when corn has about 3 leaves. It’s working great. We have a one or two fields were pigweed got past it and hurting us.

Weed Control Update

Here is an update from UGA Extension Weed Scientist Dr. Eric Prostko:

Field corn weed control does not have to be difficult.  Just about any of the herbicide programs that growers are using in Georgia do a good job of controlling most weeds, especially Palmer amaranth, when applied to small plants (<3″ tall). Check out the following pictures from my field corn plots that I rated earlier today.  These herbicide treatments were applied 17 days after planting with a CO2-powered backpack sprayer calibrated to deliver 15 GPA at 3.5 MPH using AIXR 11002 nozzles.

The most troublesome weed in Georgia field corn, in my opinion, is annual morningglory.  Field corn growers who struggle with morningglory should seriously consider a post-directed/lay-by application of Evik (ametryn) sometime after their initial POST treatment was applied. (Check out page 70 of the 2017 UGA Pest Control Handbook for more information about Evik.) The minimum corn height for post-directed applications of Evik is 12″.  If Evik is tank-mixed with glyphosate, post-directed applications can be applied up until 48″ tall corn (RR2 hybrids).

 

Halex+Atrazine+Adept, Dr. Eric Prostko

Atrazine+RU+Prowl H2O, Dr. Eric Prostko

Laudis+Atrazine+MES, Dr. Eric Prostko

Revulin+Atrazine+Adept, Dr. Eric Prostko

Disease Update

This is from UGA Extension Pathologist Dr. Bob Kemerait on 5/1/17:

Our earliest planted corn crop is beginning to approach times where we need to consider use of a fungicide (or not).  Here are some notes…

  1. There is no need at this point to protect against rust. 
  2.  Some growers might put out a fungicide application as early as the V6-V8 stage to protect against leaf blights.  Before doing so (unless the grower simply feels better doing the application anyway) scout for detection of the easily diagnosed lesions of northern corn leaf blight.  Simply finding one or two scattered in the field is NO BIG DEAL. Finding the disease more widely scattered, on a susceptible variety, could be. DO NOT MIX AN ADJUVANT OR CROP OIL with fungicide applications made prior to tassel.  This can result in significant ear deformation.
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