Monthly Archives: November 2016

Late Irrigation In Satsuma’s

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We are learning a lot this season as we experience abnormally dry weather this fall. It’s normal to be dry in October, but going into October dry is not normal. Once daylight shortens and temperatures drop, these plants move into a cold acclimation period as they prepare for dormancy. The water demand is lower. With 80 degree temperatures and no rain through October, you feel like you gotta run irrigation to get plants through the fall. When should we cut it off?

Last winter was not good for the southern peach crop, but good for citrus production. The satsumas had a great winter last year, with only a few nights getting into the mid 20s. The trees looked much better this season. These trees are between 3 and 4 years old now. They are producing satsumas but the taste is not ready.

This week, we noticed lots of suckers growing from limbs. It being November, this is really the time when these trees need to be shutting down, sending more sugars to the roots to prepare for the winter. We believe our watering through October has kept these trees producing shoots. UGA Extension Pecan Specialist Dr. Lenny Wells reminds us not to run too much irrigation on young pecans trees as they need to go dormant.

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Suckers on the limb of Brown Select

When we looked at the soil around these satsumas, we found plenty of moisture. This was inside the row between the trees. It’s actually safe to turn off irrigation when moisture is present between the trees 6 inches down. These roots still have plenty of moisture.

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Filed under Citrus, Entomology

AGAware Workshop – November 14th

A full AGAware workshop will be held on November 14, 2016 in Douglas, Georgia. The workshop being conducted by the Corporation for Community and Economic Development United of Georgia, Van McCall, Education, Outreach & Special Programs Manager, AGAware Team Manager, AgSouth Farm Credit, ACA.  This opportunity is geared for young, beginning and/or small farmers. There is no charge to attend which includes a complimentary meal.

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2016 Forestry & Wildlife Program Summary

It could not have  been a better day for our 3rd annual Forestry & Wildlife Program. If you were there for the first time, you would not know this program is only three years old. I am so indebted to everyone who works to bring this together – hay bales, trailers, tractors, barn, presenters, location and of course the food. Forester Alan Tucker sponsored this year’s meeting. Todd Milam with the Georgia Forestry Commission, Alan Tucker, and Martin Smith stayed up all night cooking our pig.

A big thanks to Pebble Hill Plantation for hosting the program this year. Our speakers were Mr. Luke Harvard (USDA – Wildlife), Dr. David Moorhead (UGA Extension Specialist), and Mr. Richard Coleman (NRCS). We had 55 people attend the meeting which represented 99,860 acres of forest land. Here are some pictures from Tuesday’s program:

Loading trailers

Loading trailers

UGA Extension Specialist Dr. David Moorhead discusses storm-damaged trees on a site at Pebble Hill Plantation.

UGA Extension Specialist Dr. David Moorhead discusses storm-damaged trees on a site at Pebble Hill Plantation.

Mr. Luke Harvard with USDA Wildlife Division discusses beaver management.

Mr. Luke Harvard with USDA Wildlife Division discusses beaver management.

The dam in the background has been damaged by beavers. Luke Harvard is working with Pebble Hill to help with the issue.

The dam in the background has been damaged by beavers. Luke Harvard is working with Pebble Hill to help with the issue.

Our pig for lunch inside the Sugar Hill Barn at Pebble Hill Plantation

Our pig for lunch inside the Sugar Hill Barn at Pebble Hill Plantation

Eating lunch following the program

Eating lunch following the program

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Evaluating Storm-Damaged Forest Areas

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Following our tropical storm, many landowners saw damage to trees in forests. We asked Dr. Moorhead to discuss this with us at this year’s Forestry & Wildlife program. At our first stop, we looked at damaged longleaf, and Dr. Moorhead gave an overview of assessing this damage. This is an exert from the publication “How to Evaluate and Manage Storm-Damaged Forest Areas“.

Storms ultimately cause damage by uprooting, wounding, bending, and breaking trees. Standing water following a hurricane can cause additional stress on trees and kill them. It’s good to have a plan to manage damaged timber.

  • Step 1 – Sketch or get aerial photograph of area ASAP.
  • Step 2 – Ground check damage to determine the need for salvage. This depends on location, amount of salvage and management objectives.

Type of Damage

Breakage

This is the most common form of damage. In pine trees, this lowers the value since breakage is random and trees are cut to specific links. Hardwood trees are seldom killed by breakage. Breakage also permits entry of stain and decay fungi.

Recommendations: For pines, if 3 live limbs or less remain, the trees should be harvest as quickly as practical. For hardwoods, trees with broken tops or branches over 3 inches in diameter should be salvaged during next scheduled harvest.

Twisted Trunks

Logs from trees that have this damage may fall apart when sawn for lumber. Those pines may have pitch flow along the truck, but appear normal.

Recommendations: Trees with evidence of twist injury should be removed, since the problem will not disappear with time.

Root Damage

Get them out! These have to be salvaged quickly since stains, decays, secondary insects (Ips, powderpost, and ambrosia beetles) will further hurt the tree. Root-sprung pines will not die quickly, but will eventually incur invasions from blue stain fungi and bark beetles.

Major Wounds

This can occur from falling tops, other uprooted trees, and branch breakage. Pine trees with major wounds to the lower bole and large roots may be attacked by bark beetles. In hardwoods, woulds that do not penetrate more than 2 inches deep (into sapwood) and have less than 144 sq inches of surface area will have only localized stain, but little decay.

Recommendations: Trees with major wounds should pretty much be removed during next schedule harvest, or included in salvage operation.

Bent Trees

This is much of what we observed at our program Tuesday. Pine trees bent to the extent that cracks and resin flow occurs could be invaded by bark beetles and disease-causing organisms. Hardwoods are not usually attacked by insects or disease.

Recommendations: Trees under 15 feet in height usually straighten. Taller, more bent hardwoods need to be removed during salvage or next scheduled harvest. Many large, green, standing trees may not be usable for veneer poles or lumber since internal ring shake, splintering and separation of the wood fibers. Many times, the only external evidence of this damage is pitch or sap flow were the injury has broken the bark. It’s easy to overlook these signs.

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Below is a table of choices for storm-damaged trees.

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Recommended Choices for Storm-Damaged Trees

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Filed under Forestry

Cold Hardy Citrus Workshop – December 3rd

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November 4, 2016 · 2:54 PM