Herbicide, Fungicide, Foliar Fertilizer Combinations In Peanut

We have been fortunate in our county with adequate rainfall – in most areas anyway. Peanut crop is looking good, we have set pods and kernels are developing in our oldest peanuts. With many questions concerning mixing chemicals, and foliar fertilizers, here is an update on current peanut condition from UGA Extension Agronomist Dr. Scott Monfort:

We tend to think July is the half way mark for the season but the truth is we have a long season ahead of us due to the late plantings throughout the state. There are many acres that are lapped and are setting pods while others are barely 8 to 10 inches wide and are struggling to grow. The good news is a majority of the crop looks good with a large part of the area receiving some rains over the last couple of weeks. However, there are many dry areas that need rain. In some of these areas, a few peanuts have stopped growing and blooming as well as showing signs of elevated leaf burn (with some leaf scorch) as a result of applications of different combinations of adjuvants, herbicides, fungicides, and foliar fertilizers being made in extremely hot and dry conditions (mid to upper 90’s and bright sunny days). A few of these fields have lost more than a third of their leaves. Growers should use caution regarding potential burn as a result of these applications but it’s not something you can eliminate due to weeds and diseases need to be addressed.

Foliar Fertilizer?

I have noticed foliar fertilizers being recommended in these situations to turn the dry land field around. The problem is, the peanuts have shut down due to lack of moisture and are not going to recover until they receive rain. The use of the foliar fertilizer is only costing the growers money and adding to the excessive foliar burn. The best thing to do is to not add these products to their fungicide or herbicide applications under these conditions. Growers can also limit burn by not spraying during the middle of the day (again this might not be an option as growers have a lot of acres to cover).

Leaf Scorch - Dr. Scott Monfort

Leaf Scorch – Dr. Scott Monfort

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Fertility, Peanuts

Comments are closed.