Monthly Archives: April 2016

More Rain

As of Friday, reports from growers were that they were able to get in the field and rip higher ground. Rain started again Friday evening, and it gave us five inches in all parts of the county that I hear. This looks like it will set us back another few days from getting back in the field. The sun came out Saturday afternoon, and we’ve had nothing but sunshine since then. Actually, reports are that some put out some fertilizer yesterday and today.

I wanted to show a picture or two of some of the water. There is a creek or branch above us that feeds water into our lake. Our house sits on the edge of the dam with a little spillway. The water running over the spillway woke us up Saturday morning. Here is what it looks like normally and then with water.

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Normal

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Rain water

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Rain water

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Pecan Budbreak: When To Spray?

PecanBudbreak 003

With Friday’s heavy rain and the arrival of budbreak, pecan growers are anxious to get their first fungicide spray on for scab protection. Infection has historically been bad in our area, and growers like to get started early. Here are some points from UGA Extension Horticulturalist Dr. Lenny Wells:

At this point, the only pecan variety growers should be concerned about is ‘Desirable’. Most varieties that have budded out far to this point are less susceptible to scab and is less of an urgency to get those covered. If ‘Desirable’ is to the point where the leaves are unfolding, and you are located in a scab prone area (below 300′ elevation or surrounded by woods), it may not be a bad idea to spray this week. If the leaves are still tightly enclosed in the form of a swollen bud or you are in an area with good air flow, I would hold off at this point.

For most other varieties, especially Stuart – which is further behind in its progression of bud break – there is no need to spray just yet. While we had significant rain Friday and there is a chance of rain one night this week, low temperatures are forecast to remain in the mid to low 40’s, especially toward the end of the week. The optimum temperature range for scab infection is 59-77 degrees F and a leaf wetness of about 12 hours. If the cooler weather this and last week slows down budbreak, it will likely slow down scab as well. Except for ‘Desirable’ in the situation described above, I would plan on waiting until next week to begin scab sprays in most areas of the state.

For an example of a proven fungicide program to consider see a previous blog post on: Example of Fungicide Program to Manage Scab.

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Filed under Disease, Pecans

Pre-Plant Burndown Options & Plant Back Restrictions For Peanuts

We’ve all been getting some questions about pre-plant burndown options for peanuts. Dooly County Ag Agent Ronnie Barentine and UGA Extension Peanut Weed Scientist Dr. Eric Prostko put together a few thoughts for us consider:

1)    Primary burndown herbicides will either be glyphosate or paraquat.  As we get closer to planting, paraquat might be preferred if a quicker burndown is needed.

2) Potential tank-mix partners with either of the above herbicides include the following:

  • 2,4-D (16 oz/A) – will help improve the control of wild radish and primrose.  Plant-back restriction for peanut based upon UGA research is 7 days.
  • FirstShot (0.5-0.8 oz/A) – will also help improve the control of radish and primrose. This may also be useful in fields where off-target movement of 2,4-D is a concern. Peanut plant-back restriction for FirstShot is 30 days.
  • Aim or ET (1-2 oz/A) – either one of these herbicides can be useful in preplant burndown situations where annual morningglory plants (except smallflower) have already emerged. Aim can be applied anytime preplant up until 24 hours after planting. ET can be applied anytime pre-plant but before peanut emergence.

3) Growers who want to get early residual control of pigweed – especially when there is a potential long delay between application and planting – may want to include Dual Magnum (16 oz/A), Warrant (48 oz/A) or Valor (2 oz/A) in the burndown.  If Valor is used in the pre-plant burndown at least 30 DBP, an additional 2 oz/A can be used PRE after planting. Valor will also help improve the POST control of radish and primrose (+10-15%).  I must admit that I would prefer either Dual or Warrant for residual control in this situation to help protect Valor from potential resistance issues.  There are no peanut plant-back restrictions for Dual or Warrant.

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Filed under Peanuts, Wildlife